Vivo S10 could come with a 108 MegaPixel camera

Vivo S10 has been leaked and is said to be powered by MediaTek Dimensity 1100 SoC. The tip comes from the Chinese microblogging website Weibo and a known Indian tipster. This will be a successor to Vivo S9 that was launched in earlier March. Vivo S10 comes with a triple rear camera setup that includes 108 megapixels of the primary sensor. It’s not sure if it will retain the dual selfie camera notch that the Vivo S9 featured. It is noted that the company has not shared any information about Vivo S10 yet. Vivo S10 could come with a 108 MegaPixel camera:

It seems that Vivo is working on the Vivo S9 successor from March called Vivo S10 and an image shared by a Chinese tipster with the pseudonym Technology big and tall (translated) on Weibo has given us a look at what to expect.

The phone has a triple rear camera setup and a blue back panel. The picture reveals that the phone comes with 108 megapixels of the primary sensor. Vivo S9 has a triple rear camera setup and a 64-megapixel primary sensor. The S10 name can be seen next to the phone. Vivo S10 could come with a 108 MegaPixel camera:

Specs

Tipster Abhishek Yadav has shared a promo poster image along with specifications of the Vivo S10 on Twitter, which says that the phone will come to MediaTek Dimensity 1100 SoC. Like Vivo S9, the phone has NFC support, Android 11, UFS 3.1 storage, and 44W fast charging support. The tipster also states that Vivo S10 comes in dual RAM configurations 8GB and 4GB virtual RAM and 8GB and 12GB virtual RAM. As of now, it’s unclear that when this phone will be launched in India as the Vivo S9 has not made its way yet. Vivo has not officially shared any information about Vivo S10 yet. Vivo S10 With MediaTek Dimensity 1100 SoC, 12GB RAM Spotted on Geekbench:

Professor of English Literature and Intellectual History, Faculty of English, University of Cambridge Professor Stefan Collini is the Professor of English Literature and Intellectual History in the Faculty of English at the University of Cambridge. His research focuses on the relationship between literature and intellectual history from the early 20th century to the present. His current research focuses on the cultural role of, and the historical assumptions expressed in, literary criticism in Britain from c.1920 to c.1970. Recent work has dealt with the question of intellectuals in 20th-century Britain, the relation between academic critics and 'men of letters', the role of cultural criticism, as well as individual essays on figures such as T.S. Eliot, F.R. Leavis, George Orwell, Raymond Williams, and Richard Hoggart. He has also done work on the history, and public debates about the role, of universities in Britain.
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